How to Can a Bushel of Peaches in 7 hours with Some Swearing, a New Pot and 29 Jars

As mentioned in last week’s peach lemonade post and in our #canning play by play on twitter, we spent most of last Tuesday turning 1 bushel of gorgeous, perfect, marvellous Red Haven Ontario peaches from BizjakFarms into 29 jars of assorted canning goodness.  

I feel like this post is a little late as once I actually got a bushel of peaches into jars I was sort of done with the whole thing for a few days. There was some swearing and lessons learned but I think I’m ready to share now.

First things First, we went to the Leslieville Farmer’s Market to eat croissants and the last of our Monteforte CSA cheese curds.  I then moved on to driving the poor peach guys crazy with distracting chit chat and placed an order for a bushel of freestones (lessons from Well Preserved on this one) to be picked up the following week. I think half of twitter was at the market that day.

The next week rolled around. We went back, obtained a ridiculous amount of peaches, fed some to the babies, let everybody take some photos and then got  Ryan and Andrew to carry them to the car while I went & got more cheese curds.


So after eating a dozen and taking about 2000 photos it was time to get cracking. Or smashing as its now known. 

Growing up, canning peaches was one of the few “old fashioned” canning activities my mother did. In fact she has 4 pages of scribbly notes about it which is the 1980’s equivalent to blogging.  I bet there are photos too. I have fond memories of eating these and admiring them in their jars.

Our objective was to can peaches to eat all winter. It’s my seasonal depression defence strategy. Let me tell you, when you bite into a Niagara Peach in the middle of February life is good.

Really it’s simple and once we got going things moved smoothly. 
Start by preparing all your jars; we did this the night before. Dallas has a good run down of safe canning practices on her post about her easy-peasy co-opertive peaches.  We used 2 dozen 1 litre wide mouth Jars.

 

 


Next make up a light syrup of 
1 part sugar to 2 parts water.  We used the organic stuff in a carton so it has a darker colour which really looks nice with peaches.  I think we used 4 cartons, something like 16 cups of sugar by the end of the day. We made a big pot on fairly low heat and kept adding to it as needed. Just keep to the ratio and you’re fine. 

You want to wash your peaches really well.  These were low spray peaches as organic are really hard to find especially in bulk. You want to wash off the fuzz and the pesticides. Peaches are always up there on the dirty dozen.

Next 

Blanche
Peel (we’ll get back to this)
Cut (we did some halves and some quarters)
As you cut the peaches, sprinkle lemon juice on them to prevent browning.
We processed for 25 minutes but processing times will depend on where you live and the size of your jars.

Blanching and Peeling was a total disaster, greatly reducing the yield and quickly raising the panic level. These perfect lovely peaches were crumbling in my hands.

2 large baskets were reduced to 7 litres of uglyfrustrating peaches.  We quickly movedon to not blanching or peeling, leaving some in halves, some in quarters and had great results.  I will never ever peel another peach and haven’t a clue why all the instructions and recipes I looked at were all peeling peaches.  What a mess.

Our other near-disaster was not having a large enough pot. I have canned many things but never used the giant jars before; so there I was, with hot peaches in hot jars and Ryan running out to buy a bigger pot.  I love my new giant pot.

All in all, we have some lovely peaches and learnt some valuable lessons; always make sure you have a big enough pot (this is a lesson is optimism perhaps?) and never-ever-no-way-no-how bother with blanching or peeling your peaches; especially when there are approximately 120 of them.

PS these were the last 4 peach halves and we were out of jars so this is 1 peach in one jar.  I think they’re for lunch.

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13 Responses to “How to Can a Bushel of Peaches in 7 hours with Some Swearing, a New Pot and 29 Jars”

  1. Mama Ash says:

    Yum! I want one!

  2. Meeling says:

    They look so good!!

    Yes, blanching and peeling peaches sounds extremely messy. Glad you got it all sorted out in the end.

  3. Lilah J B says:

    Great photos, I want to eat some. Canned peaches are so good!

  4. K and A Alesandrini says:

    Awesome. I feel like I could do this now, after watching you go through it from afar. Thank you for being inspiring, Laura.

  5. Julia says:

    That looks like a ton of work, but some beautiful results. Way to go!

  6. aquariann says:

    Wow, that looks like a lot of work! But worth it to have such a tasty treat in the winter. :D

  7. Kaili Williams says:

    So much work, but it looks so yummy!

    -Kaili
    kaw-studios.blogspot.com

  8. Linda Pruitt says:

    Lots of work, but well worth it! I better get busy at my house!

  9. Matti says:

    Delicious. I remember when we use to can a ton of stuff after the harvest including peaches. Thanks for the trip down memory lane. Matti

  10. [...] but clearly that was not the case.  This year we made a few batches of jam, then fought with a bushel of peaches, moved on to tomatoes, so many tomatoes, tried two types of cranberry sauce and ended off with [...]

  11. Lia says:

    Really. Really. Awesome! Loved this post, the photos, your descriptions, the story, everything. In fact as I was reading it, I forgot about everything else for an entire minute, and that rarely ever happens. I felt as if I was right there with you transforming those beautiful orange babies, and although I’ve never done any sort of canning before, this looked like a really fun adventure. Some well-invested time and the result of which is a healthy, natural treat – yum! I could go for that. :)

  12. Meryl says:

    I’m relocating to Canada for January–looks like you’re all set to ride the winter out properly there! ;)

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